Fear Of Fear, And The Delusion Of Safety

Avoidance will give us the delusion of safety but will prevent us from the very outcome we want.

The most important thing to get you what you want

Trust will determine how much of the 'could'  becomes 'actual'. 

Psychological Safety isn’t the precursor to a high performing team

A high performing team should be able to have difficult conversations successfully

Toxic Behaviours: How To Rebuild Safe Cultures

The original behaviours don’t have to be experienced to create a strong imprint.

I am Not as Nice as People Think

Psychological safety is not the opposite of holding people to high standards through accountability. If we did that, then psychological safety would drive complacency.

When you are a high achiever, how do you...

Concentrate on the pride you feel before you dilute it with your next goal

Get Whatever You Want in 2019

There is little you can’t do if you want. Really, very little. Your mind is smart and your body is privileged. Often, we think of ourselves as not capable to do something when the truth is we just haven't ruthlessly prioritised it. 

Is your team using fear-based intelligence?

  • Do you see polite but not constructive conversations?

  • Do any/all team members struggle to step up for new tasks or solution finding?

  • Do you see unequal contribution/airtime across the group?

  • Do you see any behavioural signs of the intention to dismiss or diminish others’ contribution?

  • Do the conversations have an emotional charge that seems inappropriate to the task or conversation at hand?

  • Can you see some team members who are able to contribute more but don’t?

Wet soccer and how to avoid clumpy collaboration

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I was watching my five-year-old play soccer this weekend, in the rain (you may applaud my parental fortitude now).  While standing there shivering with hands in pockets huddled together with other wet parents, several things occurred to me.

The 16 players ran their little hearts out, getting muddy knees and sweaty foreheads as they spent their energy furiously. There was no lack of effort. In fact, they kept going even when the whistle was blown. Yet, their energy spent was not always directional, sometimes (read, a lot of the times) their focus was not the goals. I’m not sure they would have cared if they’d crossed the boundaries into the next playing field and continued onwards into the dog park. The clump of players, with furrowed frowns, tussled up and down the pitch, back and forth battling against each other, even when in the same team. I even wondered (as I watched them through my steamed up glasses) whether being in ‘the clump’ had become a greater goal for the players than the goal goals.

Sports heroes are often used as shining examples of leadership excellence and remarkable team collaboration because the analogies to business are so helpful. And, after watching my son this weekend, I was reminded of not one single one of them. But, I did think how much we have to learn from the analogies that the other end of the spectrum give us.

Remarkable collaboration means:

  1. focusing on the things that lead to achievement and limiting the energy spent elsewhere

  2. remembering the goal even when distracted

  3. having clear boundaries

  4. passing to each other (less clumping) so you cover a more extensive area with less effort

  5. stepping above clump behaviour (the psychology of group behaviour)

  6. making sure all the grownups have coffee

Amy helps individuals, teams and organisations collaborate courageously for remarkable achievements. Sign up so you catch all her posts www.DrAmySilver.com/silverlinings and see her website for details on programs available or contact Amy's team on hello@DrAmySilver.com. COMING SOON!!!! Free webcast on how to maximise collaboration in public service and event in Melbourne - details on website www.DrAmySilver.com.

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The 3 questions you need to know to drive your team achievement

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Some groups and cultures work well together, increasing their cognitive diversity and achieving more, quicker. Others are full of increased risk and trapped intelligence. Trapped by fear of being devalued by others, or fear of difficult situations and conversations, or trapped by ineffective communication.

To elevate group capability using The Safe Space methodology we ask the following three questions.

1) Do the individuals in the team understand how to activate their best self and when they get triggered into behaviours that are unhelpful? What can be done to increase the awareness of our own individual triggers, to find a space between an event and our reaction, so we can choose the best response?

2) Do the individuals in the team understand how they trigger others best self? Creating the space for others to contribute their full value is a smart move if you want to acheive more. What can you do to increase your awareness of how your own behaviour impacts what others are able to do?

3)  How committed are we to the team entity, not just our own contribution? Our ego and our beliefs often have to shift from the cultural norm.

A starting point for you to drive your team/culture achievement might be for you to take these three questions to your colleagues and have a conversation about how you are doing.

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